March-April 2019

GIM March-April 2019 cover

The March-April issue of GIM International is dedicated to unmanned aerial systems (UAS) and their role in the mapping and surveying profession. There have been rapid advancements in drones over the years, yet there is widespread consensus that we have still only seen a fraction of how UAVs could ultimately improve efficiency for geospatial professionals and their customers. This edition contains the following articles:

- Connecting New Geoinformation Technologies to Wide-ranging Applications
- Recent Developments in Airborne Lidar
- UAS Lidar for Ecological Restoration of Wetlands
- 5G Promotes Prosperity of Low-airspace Economy
- The Riyadh Metro Project
- Topcon Top of the Pack for Finnish National Land Survey

 

The Challenges of Drone Use in Facade Mapping

The Challenges of Drone Use in Facade MappingThere have been rapid advancements in unmanned aerial systems over recent years, yet there is widespread consensus that we have still only seen a fraction of how unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or ‘drones’) could ultimately improve efficiency for geospatial professionals and their customers. To get a glimpse of the future, GIM International spoke to Mark Nicolai, co-founder of industry start-up Aeroscan, who shared his vision of how drones could form the missing link between aerial imaging and terrestrial data capture. Read on...

5G and Geodata

5G and GeodataBased on an assessment of all the geomatics-related trade events in the world, the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV or ‘drone’) service-provider sector is growing faster than any other. Companies in that sector are particularly interested in the evolution of 5G because it can boost their quality of service and innovation. In turn, the regulations will mandate the ability to transmit real-time hyper-local geodata between local authorities and drones used in urban areas. Low-airspace services must not only be very efficient, but also safe. Read on...

UAS Lidar and Wetlands

UAS Lidar for Ecological Restoration of WetlandsWetlands are essential ecosystems which provide numerous benefits to society as a whole, but their functionality strongly depends on the hydrology and topography of the watershed, thus creating the need for monitoring. The use of terrestrial topographical survey methods can be a challenging task in wetlands, however. Flooded areas, muddy terrain and low vegetation can substantially slow down or even prevent the movement of surveyors, while tall vegetation can obstruct GPS reception. As this article outlines, advanced technologies such as airborne or UAS Lidar offer interesting alternatives for surveying the hydrology and topography of wetlands. Read on...

Recent Developments in Airborne Lidar

Recent Developments in Airborne LidarThe arrival of airborne Lidar, also referred to as airborne laser scanning (ALS), has revolutionized area-wide 3D data acquisition of topography, bathymetry, vegetation, buildings and infrastructure. This article presents an overview of the tremendous progress made since then in both sensor and aircraft technology. Current trends include a steady increase of the measurement rate, achievements in full waveform processing, the spread of multispectral and topo-bathymetric laser scanners, the introduction of single-photon sensitive airborne sensors and the advent of integrated active and passive systems (Figure 1). On top of that, this article highlights how the ongoing miniaturization has recently enabled the application of Lidar on unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), resulting in ultra-high-resolution 3D point clouds with centimetre precision. Read on... 

 
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