GRACE Follow-up Mission to Keep Close Eye on Ice Loss

A few months ago, the GRACE mission’s two Earth observation satellites burnt up in the atmosphere. Although this loss was planned, for the experts at the Alfred Wegener Institute it left a considerable gap in monitoring ice loss in the Antarctic and Greenland. Now the follow-up mission will finally be launched, and will play a vital role in predicting future sea level rise. One of the greatest threats in connection with climate change is the continuing rise in sea level – and the more intensively the enormous ice sheets in Greenland and the Antarctic melt, the worse it will become.... (read more)
2018-05-18 10:42:21

How the Moon Holds the Key to Improving Satellite Views of Earth

Many Earth observation satellites make use of an added ingredient to ensure reliable, good-quality environmental data: the Moon. While the surface of the Earth is ever changing, the face of the Moon has stayed the same for millions of years, apart from occasional meteoroid impacts. This makes the light reflecting from the lunar surface an ideal calibration source for optical Earth-observing instruments. Now an ESA-led project has plans to make it more useful still. An instrument has been placed high on the slopes of Mount Teide in Tenerife, above the majority of clouds and airborne dust, designed to measure nightly... (read more)
2018-05-02 10:08:43

DJI’s Metric Camera for Aerial Surveying

DJI has released the X4S camera, a lightweight version of the large aerial cameras carried in manned aircraft. How do aerial or metric cameras differ to a DSLR? An aerial mapping camera is primarily designed to have a low distortion metric lens and reliable construction to maintain its calibration. To achieve this the cameras have very few moving parts, particularly those that would affect the lens focal length. Aerial camera lenses are very high quality and virtually distortion free. This, and a constant lens focal length, means that every pixel is in the right place. 3D mapping from photogrammetry is based on... (read more)
2018-03-19 11:43:13

Bluesky Uses Mobile Phones to Create 3D Maps

Aerial mapping company Bluesky has completed a research project backed by the UK government’s innovation agency, Innovate UK, to develop the use of mobile phones for capturing accurate 3D spatial information. The nine-month investigation focused on the use of standard smartphone technology to capture and calibrate video footage, then convert it to 3D information. Accurate measurements of essential infrastructure, such as overhead power lines and other utility facilities, could then be extracted using specially developed algorithms and workflows. Designed to provide an accurate record of the feature’s location and its environment, the Bluesky project is expected to appeal to electricity... (read more)
2018-02-14 10:12:26

Medium-format Cameras for High-accuracy Mapping

Field Test of the Phase One iXU-RS1000 Camera
Small and medium-format cameras are increasingly gaining popularity for mapping small and medium-size areas, corridors, construction sites and cities. They are also used as companions of Lidar systems, mounted on unmanned aerial systems (UASs), and for monitoring and inspecting infrastructure. The author of this article investigated the suitability of the Phase One iXU-RS1000 camera for high-accuracy mapping and found this medium-format camera to be a metric camera with stable and clearly definable interior orientation parameters, producing images of high geometric and radiometric quality. In photogrammetry it is important that cameras produce images of which the geometric distortions are as small... (read more)
2018-01-17 10:09:48

UAS-borne Lidar for Mapping Complex Terrain and Vegetation Structure

New Lightweight Laser Scanners for Very-high-resolution Point Clouds
The development of lightweight, survey-grade Lidar sensors has made it possible to equip unmanned aerial systems (UASs) with very precise laser scanners, thus opening up new possibilities in the domain of close-range 3D mapping. To test the capabilities of UAS-borne laser scanning, a flight experiment was conducted using the RIEGL VUX full-waveform scanner mounted on a RIEGL RiCOPTER UAS platform. In the experiment, both the topography and the vegetation structure of an alluvial forest along the River Pielach in Lower Austria were captured. The resulting point cloud has a density of more than 1,500 points per square metre and an... (read more)
2017-12-20 10:30:09

Stefania Amici

Stefania Amici, PhD, is with Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Rome, Italy. She focuses on multiple-scale remote sensing for hazard research. Prior to that, she worked on calibration of hyperspectral sensors for solar-system exploration at National Research Council (CNR) for almost seven years.  (read more)
2017-12-20 01:46:36

Werner Lienhart

Werner Lienhart is professor and head of the Institute of Engineering Geodesy and Measurement Systems at Graz University of Technology, Austria. Prior to his current position he was product manager innovation at Leica Geosystems AG’s headquarters in Switzerland. His main research interests are the development and calibration of geodetic and fibre-optic sensors and the analysis of inhomogeneous structural monitoring data. (read more)
2017-12-20 11:07:23

Philipp Glira

Philipp Glira studied geodesy at the Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien). Currently he is a PhD student in the photogrammetry research group within the Department of Geodesy and Geoinformation at TU Wien, under the supervision of Prof Norbert Pfeifer. His research focuses on the orientation and calibration of images and point clouds. Within his PhD he developed a flexible and efficient strip adjustment method for aerial laser scanning point clouds. (read more)
2017-12-20 10:39:08

Norbert Pfeifer

Prof Norbert Pfeifer obtained his PhD in terrain modelling from TU Wien in Austria, then moved to TU Delft in The Netherlands in 2003 to working as an assistant professor in laser scanning. In 2006 he became senior researcher at the University of Innsbruck, Austria, in the Department of Geography and became a full professor in photogrammetry at TU Wien in 2009. His research interests include photogrammetry and laser scanning, from the measurement process, orientation and calibration to 3D modelling and applications in the environmental sciences. (read more)
2017-12-18 04:06:31
Search Filter